Contemplation and Icons

Hello Fellow Iconographers:

This month the topic of our newsletter is contemplation and Icons.  As I continue teaching Icon writing (painting), now online due to the pandemic, it seems important to post about the importance of linking prayer to the process of painting Icons.  In order for the Icon to reflect God’s Presence, it’s very important for the iconographer to be in a state of grace and prayer while working.

Icon Class at Holy Cross
Icon Class at Holy Cross

Reflection on the saints being being painted and continuous prayer help to insure that the icon is an authentic expression of who the saint is when transfigured by God’s grace.  This is the true likeness of the saint- his transfigured person through the light of God’s action upon him/her in their lives.

In The Eastern theological tradition, man is seen to be on a mystical journey that leads to “Theosis” or deification. Icons represent this union between God and man. The Icon is a manifestation of the presence of God. It draws and brings us into this Presence so that we can experience God in our soul. In this way we become a living icon of God.

Contemplation and Icons

Face of Christ Icon written by C.Hales
Face of Christ Icon written by C.Hales

In Byzantine religious culture,  the purpose of meditation, prayer and contemplation  was always to lead to enlightenment, that is, prayerful immersion in the rays of Divine energy as evidenced in the icon of the Transfiguration.

In Vita Consecrata we read this from Pope John Paul II,  :
We must confess that we all have need of this silence, filled with the presence of him who is adored : in theology, so as to exploit fully its own sapiential and spiritual soul; in prayer, so that we may never forget that seeing God means coming down the mountain with a face so radiant that we are obliged to cover it with a veil (Ex 34.33); in commitment, so that we will refuse to be locked in a struggle without love and forgiveness. All, believers and non-believers alike, need to learn a silence that allows the other to speak when and how he wishes, and allows us to understand his words”

St Benedict Icon by Christine Hales
St Benedict Icon by Christine Hales

Whereas St. Benedict, who has set the tone for the spirituality of the West, calls us, first of all, to listen, the Byzantine Fathers focus on gazing. This is especially evident in the liturgical life of the Eastern Church as the 2nd Ecumenical council in 787 makes clear, when it says :
“What is communicated through the Word is revealed silently through the Image.” In Byzantine Liturgy therefore, Word and Icon complement each other.

Each of us is an Icon of God, and through prayer and contemplation, we are able to see our brothers and sisters as God sees them, and then bring this deep sense of God’s view to the process of painting Icons.

Hesychasm is a mystical form of prayer practiced by Byzantine Monks and iconographers of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Jesus‘s teaching in the Gospel of Matthew tells us that “whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you”. Hesychasm in tradition has been the process of retiring inward  in order to achieve an experiential knowledge of God. The Jesus prayer, prayer of the breath, was commonly the prayer used when painting icons in this tradition.

Transfiguration Icon
Transfiguration Icon

The Jesus prayer is this, or a variation of it: “Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me.”

And to finish, here is a quote from “The Message”, a treatise from fifteenth century St. Joseph of Volokolamsk:

“Wherever you may be, O Beloved, on sea or on land, at home, walking, sitting, or lying down- ceaselessly pray with a clear conscience, saying, “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me,” and God will hear you.”

Equipped with prayer and contemplation, the iconographer is able to paint with God’s direction and all will be well!

Saint Marina Icon
Paleologic Icon of Saint Marina

Contact Us:

Each month, we choose a topic relevant to the education of contemporary iconographers, and I invite you to make suggestions, submit possible topics, or write a guest post. Contact me!

ONLINE ICON PAINTING ClASSES

I have two on line Icon painting classes coming up in September and November, you are welcome to join us!

Blessings and prayers until next month,

Christine Hales

www.newchristianicons.com

Saint Raphael

Dear Iconographers:

Raphael
Raphael

During this time of pandemic it’s good to think about Icons of healing and restoration.  There are many that come to mind, but Saint Raphael seems particularly appropriate as he is the patron saint not only of travelers, but also of physicians, nurses, and medical workers.  For this reason, I am offering an online icon painting class in September where we will write an Icon of Archangel Raphael.  His feast day is September 29, and is celebrated along with Saints Michael and Archangel Gabriel.

The story of Archangel Raphael is beautifully told in the book of Tobit in the Apocrypha.  Raphael means God heals.  In the book of Enoch he is believed to have healed the earth when it was defiled by the sins of fallen angels.   In John 5: 1-4, the Gospel speaks of the pool at Bethesda where many sick people gathered, awaiting the movement of the waters.  “An angel of the Lord descended at certain times into the pond and the water was moved.  And he that went down first into the water was made whole of whatsoever infirmity he was under.” Because of the healing powers associated with Raphael, he is considered to be the angel in that Scriptural story.

Archangel Raphael
Archangel Raphael

In the book of Tobit, Raphael appears in the form of a man who will accompany Tobias on a journey.  To the recently blinded Tobit (Tobias’ father) Raphael says, “Take courage, the time is near for God to heal you.  Take Courage” Tobit 5:10.

The Archangel Raphael
The Archangel Raphael

During the journey, Raphael heals Sarah of the demons that plagued her so that she could safely marry Tobias.  Tobit is also healed of his blindness by Raphael.  When Raphael finally reveals his identity as an angel of God the two men were afraid and fell down, but Raphael said to them ” Do not be afraid, peace be with you. Bless God forevermore…I was not acting by my own will but by the will of God.  Bless Him each and every day and sing His praises….. They kept blessing God and singing His praises and they acknowledged God for these marvelous deeds of His, when an angel of the Lord had appeared to them.” Tobit 12:16

In this story and also in the meaning  of the name Raphael, credit is given to God who heals, and it is to God that the angels and the saints point and direct our worship and attention.

Raphael is thought to guard travelers on their journeys and is sometimes depicted with a staff and also holding  fish which relates to the healing of Tobit’s blindness with fish gall as directed by Raphael. In Europe Raphael is known as the protector of sailors and is shown in a relief on the Doge’s palace in Venice with a scroll saying “Keep the Gulf quiet.”

Rembrandt
Rembrandt

Raphael is sometimes thought of being one of the three angels who visited Sarah and Abraham. He, along with Archangels Michael and Gabriel were sent to fulfill  God’s will concerning Sodom, Sarah and Abraham.

 

Trinity
Trinity

Flannery O’Connor is believed to have said the Saint Raphael prayer at the beginning of each day:

“O Raphael, lead us toward those we are waiting for, those who are waiting for us; Raphael, Angel of happy meeting, lead us by the hand toward those we are looking for.  May all our movements be guided by Your light and transfigured with your joy.” Amen

During these difficult times of pandemic, let us pray often for those afflicted and for all those doctors, nurses and medical workers who are at the front lines of this battle.  And we pray also for the speedy discovery of a vaccine cure, in Jesus name, Amen.

Christine Hales

Christine’s Icon Website

Christine’s Icon Classes

 

 

 

Canons of Iconography?

Greetings Fellow Iconographers:

Canons of Iconography?

Reflecting on the current interest in icon painting we are experiencing in this last thirty years, it is interesting to note the many and varied styles of icon writing that are emerging.  How are we able to discern what is a true Icon?  By what standards do we judge the authenticity of our own work?  In my early days of Icon study I often heard the words “The Canons of Iconography” referred to as our standard of comparison.  However, upon closer investigation, it became clear that these Canons were more mythical than reality.  There is no Bible of Icon writing. 

Traditions of the Past

So, how can we carry on the valuable traditions of icon writing from the past? In the same way that artists have always learned their craft- we need to copy from the masters.  In an articulate and well- researched article on just this subject, Romanian Iconographer Todor Mitrovic has written two articles for the Orthodox Arts Journal this month.

In the first article, published online, June 23, 2020, Todor Mitrovic writes about the high achievement of  Byzantine art as a very high expression of European culture for its time.  He speaks of the canons, or canonicity, of iconography as not sufficiently representing what great church art was in the middle ages or being able to serve the needs of iconographers today.  Understandably, the need to distinguish between what is Christian and what is not was a legitimate need in the early centuries of Christianity.

“Very early, disputes arose as to what was genuinely Christian.  Hence, the Church was constantly forced to set up norms, e.g., for doctrine, for life, for accepting books as Scripture, for worship. It thus felt the need for a word that would unmistakably denote what is valid and binding in the Church…”  T. Mitrovic

However, slavish adherence to an imaginary canon can only limit the authentic expression of God’s Holy Spirit in Icons today.

“…the image of the list of icon-painting rules, however imaginary it might have been, hangs over the heads of contemporary iconographers, and radically defines the entire artistic production of the Orthodox Church.” T. Mitrovic

Are There Rules and Where to Find Them?    Part II

In the second installment of Mr. Mitrovic’s article in the Orthodox Arts Journal, he speaks of how the canons of the seventh ecumenical council only proclaim the need for icons to be painted, but they do not attempt to  interfere with their artistic execution.

That seems that the Byzantine Church never attempted a legal codification of its artistic production, so why do we attempt to do so now?

Instructions for medieval icon painting were general canons which apply to  diverse forms of artistic creation.  “…in the most famous manual, compiled by Dionysius of Fourna, for example, where there is a recipe for mixing the colors for painting the face, and norms for the proportions of the human figure, the author subverts any concept of a rule, since he states that this is only one among many possibilities …we cannot find there any set of direct prescriptions on producing an icon that would be “canonical” in the narrow sense. Moreover, some clumsy attempts to codify any such prescriptions, especially with ever-advancing reproductive technology, has led to cold and sterile results in church art, which could hardly be compared with the genuine achievements of Byzantine art.”   Todor Mitrovic

Language vs Canon

Could  the traditional aspect of church art be designated not by the term canon, but by the term language? Mr. Mitrovic asks the question:what would happen if the normative aspect of church art were treated in a linguistic manner?”

Linguistic structures are extremely conservative and slow to change, not because of some ideology, but because their primary purpose is to communicate and understand.  Surely, good icon painting is about communicating and bringing the viewer into God’s presence through the visual image.  And there are many aspects of  creating icons that help to make this possible.  It’s just that there are different ways to use these creative elements- the application of paint for example, or line quality, or color density, and still be within the validity of icon painting language and form.

I suggest you read these articles in order to understand the nuances and implications for your own icon writing.  Mr. Mitrovic closes with;

“Although the terms canon and language have some semantic affinity, their use as paradigms, in the end, might have quite a different impact on the development of church art.”

In my lifetime, there has never been more need than that of the present for Christian artists to support one another in this quest for an authentic visual language that represents a theology that can heal and speak to our times.

Until next month,

Prayerfully,

Christine Hales

Icon website         ONLINE Icon Painting Class

An American School of Iconography

Greetings Fellow Iconographers:

Last Supper, School of A. Rublev
Last Supper, School of A. Rublev

This month I wanted to write about the idea of an American School of Iconographers.  Not a brick and mortar school, but a school in the Benedictine sense of a community of people who share values, beliefs, and common goals.  A school of people  who desire to learn from and support each other in the goal of painting Icons would , ideally, be comprised of diversity as well as commonality.

One of the tenets in the Iconographer’s Rules  that we all learn when starting to write Icons is “Never forget the joy of spreading icons throughout the world.”  Although Icon painting is often a solitary process, joining together in classes can help combat the undesirable effects of isolation and promote growth and learning.

Mother of God Hodegitria
Mother of God Hodegitria

Recently, during the stay at- home -order due to the corona virus, several online Icon classes have sprung up, and I suspect that we will see a lot more of these in the future. Will these replace the onsite icon classes taught by iconographers at colleges and monasteries?  No.  Live, in-person classes provide an opportunity for feedback, practice, and personal remedial direction, and that works hand in hand with on line classes at other times during the year.  The on line classes provide an ongoing way to practice drawing and painting that make the in person classes a valuable source of individual instruction.

Writing Icons is no simple task, as most of you have discovered.  Initially, a novice Iconographer is encouraged to copy Icons from before the sixteenth century.  This usually involves tracing the Icon, then transferring the image to a board and painting.  However, after a few years of this kind of practice, one can move on to learning to draw iconographically.  Drawing icons freehand, and learning the basics of sacred geometry composition are tasks for intermediate level iconographers.  Color theory comes next, along with practice, practice, practice.  It’s good to practice on watercolor paper, do studies, learn how to draw garments, and hands.  Then, drawing the face, understanding dynamic symmetry and theology of icons are tasks for advanced Icon classes.

Seraphim Drawing
Seraphim Drawing

There’s always so much to learn and it’s exciting to have such rich subject matter to explore.  When you add all this to the joy of growing closer to God through prayer, contemplation, and icon writing you have an absorbing and life giving practice.

Nun Juliana, Saint Peter Drawing
Nun Juliana, Saint Peter Drawing

Being an active member of a Church and faith community is essential to writing icons also.  Since God, theology and art are so intertwined in this process, it is important to have a spiritual director with whom to ponder and question how God wants to use this art form through your work.  Iconographers need to have an active prayer life and understand how Icons are used in contemplation and liturgy.

Nun Juliana Icon
Nun Juliana Icon

The American Association of Iconographers is a free association of Iconographers who share a common desire to be supportive to each other and grow in faith and icon writing.  We have a Face Book Group ( just search for American Association of Iconographers on Face Book) which you can join.  Anyone who is a member can post their ideas, questions, useful links, etc.  Because it is an Ecumenical group, we practice acceptance of both Orthodox and non Orthodox Iconography.  We usually don’t publicize or promote individual Iconographers’ classes, but instructional video links are acceptable for posting.

It Takes Time to Develop

There have been many developments and changes to the world, as well as to the world of Iconography over the last twenty years.  Similarly, it will take time to develop characteristics, attributes, and a standard for excellence in this field.

It will be helpful to see visual examples and hear of other Iconographers’ experiences in their locations regarding community, learning, creating a standard for quality and relevance.   Perhaps in the future we could have a virtual conference or series of meetings to discuss these topics.  Also, writing blogs for this group can be a way to share experience and perspective.

So far, the guiding principles are: The creation of a spiritually healthy, ecumenical, support group that promotes the practice of Icon sharing, learning, and promoting the love of Icons that can provide direction and possibly regulate a  set of guidelines for future Iconographers.

Please feel free to use the contact form below with suggestions, ideas, and possible submissions for blog posts.

May God continue to bless you in all that you say and do,

Christine Hales

New Christian Icons.com

 

 

Practice

Dear Fellow Iconographers:
Angel

Teaching Icon classes as I do in monasteries, churches and art centers, the question that always arises at the end of class:  How can I continue with Icon painting?  Practice is what I always say. For that reason, this month’s blog for the American Association of Iconographers is a collection of information and links to help with further studies.

Ideally, someone who is learning to write Icons will choose a style or a teacher which whom to study.  But even with that, one can only realistically take one or two workshops per year.  What to do in the meantime?  Here are my suggestions:

Practice

Using sketch paper and pencil, draw as much as possible.  Copy Icons from books, prints, or the internet.  Drawing is the number one art skill needed in Icon writing, as it is in all painting.  Learning to think on paper is a valuable skill.  A book that I recommend to beginners is: Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards.  You can copy Icons in some of her exercises and you will be surprised at how quickly your drawing will improve.

Raising of Lazarus Icon Sketch in Black and White Christine Hales
Raising of Lazarus Icon Sketch in Black and White.  Christine Hales

 

 

Simplified Palette
Simplified Palette

Use watercolor paper and the four basic color of Icon writing: red ochre, black, white and yellow ochre.  Make color and tonal studies of Icons on water color paper.  Again, this simple practice will yield large results.

 

 

John the Baptist watercolor sketch Christine Hales
John the Baptist watercolor sketch Christine Hales

 

Icon Retreats and Workshops

For those who choose to study with me, here is a link to upcoming classes.  My teaching method is always evolving and inspired by my prayer life.  I particularly enjoy helping students who have had some experience writing Icons and now want to create their own Icon (still copied from before the Renaissance).  If you do sign up for one of my classes and wish to do this, please email me well before the class date so that we can prepare you for getting the most out of the retreat.

Resources for viewing Iconographic Imagery

Kolomenskaya Versta is a site selling Icon books and materials. It is based in Russia and they regularly post free images to copy as well as links to all kinds of Iconographic information.  Also known as Russian Modern Orthodox Icon, here is a link to their FB page.

Online illuminated Manuscripts from  Open Culture.  Also, the Book of Kells on line.

A beautiful FB page with many good examples of Byzantine Icons- Byzantine Art

Museum of Russian Icons, 203 Union Street, Clinton, Mass.  There is an exhibition of Prosopon Icons currently in addition to their permanent collection.

Jacob Wrestling with the Angel, Nikita Andrei
Jacob Wrestling with the Angel, Nikita Andreiv

Resources for Icon Materials

Natural Pigments  They have pigments, red clay, gold leaf adhesives, brushes, etc..

Kremer Pigments has a shop in NYC but you can also order on linear an immense array of pigment choices and other materials like stand oil, linseed oil, etc.

Pandora- Pigment sets, Painting Tools, Porcelain Palette

Gold Leaf and Gilding Supplies

Sepp Leaf    www.seppleaf.com

Golden Leaf Products  www.goldenleafproducts.com

Gold Leaf Wholesalers  LA Gold

Icon Boards

Pandora Icon Boards, New York

St. John’s Workshop   Icon boards

 

Icon Painting Videos from You Tube

Villanova University– full process of painting an Icon.

Julia Brigit Hayes teaches online classes for drawing and painting Icons

Prosopon School of Iconology teaches workshops nationally. Another short video of their technique.

East X West online Icon Course with Sr. Petra offers many video tutorials and a thorough grounding in Iconographic history, drawing and painting.

That’s all for this month. Please let me know if this has helped you, and I wish you peace and  joy in spreading the beauty of Icons throughout the world!

Christine Hales

Icon Website 

Print Website

Fine Art Website

 

 

Lifestyle of an Iconographer

Hello Iconographers!

Icon of Mary
Icon of Mary by Christine Simoneau Hales

I know that many of you lead busy lives and are able to take Icon classes only  once or twice a year- and those classes usually last only a few precious days.  The best way to really benefit from our intermittent classes is to do as much reading and preparation on Icons as possible.  With that in mind, I want to refer you to a series of four articles written by Father Silouan Justinian for the Orthodox Journal.  It is a series called: “Imagination, Expression, Icon, Encountering the Internal Prototype.”

 

As there are many nuances involved in writing Icons that cover both the spiritual life of an Iconographer and the artist’s creative skills, I encourage you to take a look at these.   Here are the links to each part of the series:

Part One 

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

My suggestion would be to bookmark or print out each article to read at a time where you have leisure to ponder and think about each one.  Eventually, I hope to compile a book of such essays and other instructional materials for the potential Iconography student.  As this field continues to grow in popularity, a high standard of training that incorporates the writings of leading contemporary authors along  with practical, good artistic training would be a beneficial addition to the field.

Fr. Paul Wattson
detail of Fr. Paul Wattson Icon at Graymoor Monastery

We all know that the lifestyle of an Iconographer is one of prayer and fasting.  Also, we know that being part of a Church, having good spiritual direction, receiving the Sacraments regularly are also important to writing Icons.  Within this context, good artistic training is also important.  What a task!  But as you all have experienced, it is an exciting and blessed task.  No one will be able to do everything perfectly, but willingness and diligence to seriously undertake the study will have very positive effects.

Saint Benedict Icon by CS Hales
St. Benedict Icon by Christine Simoneau Hales

In St. Benedict’s Prologue to “Saint Benedict’s Rule For Monks” he says:

“My son, listen carefully to your master’s teaching. Treasure it in your heart. Be open to receive and generous to respond to the counsel of a loving father.  You have strayed from God by the sloth of disobedience.  Return to him then, by the work of obedience.  Accordingly, I speak to you, whoever you may be, who giving up your own will and taking the strong and bright weapons of obedience, are prepared to fight for the true King, Christ”.

In taking up the task of Icon writing, we always need to remember that it is about much more than just our own will. Here is a quote from the above mentioned Part 4 of Father Silouan’s article:

“In other words, the icon painter should not repeat the resultof encounter, but rather his work should arise and re-present (ex-press) a true, fresh and living re-encounter with the subject depicted. But, this, of course, is not to promulgate the modernist cult of individualism or so called “artistic genius.” On the contrary, as just mentioned, life in the Body of Christ presupposes the flourishing of ourselves as unique and true persons[x] in loving communion with one another, in contradistinction to our ego-centric or individualistic identity in which we wither as isolated numerical “units.”[xi]Moreover, let us not forget that in this ecclesial life, “there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit.”[xii] That is, inner union in the Spirit does not mean uniformity at the expense of diversity. Each person as a member, in a unique manner, contributes towards the edification of the whole Body. Therefore, the traditional practice of “anonymity,” that is, of not signing the icon, should not be understood as an aspiration towards the complete obliteration of the iconographer’s gifts and creative temperament.[xiii] It is rather a reminder that only in humble cooperation with the Divine Craftsman, in becoming one with Him through the Holy Spirit, will his true self and art flourish to the fullness of their capacity. Obedience becomes liberation. Thereby he will be able to uncover nuances contained in the prototypes previously unnoticed and contribute unrepeatable expressionsof Tradition. In undermining this side of the icon, seeking to protect it from “artistic license” and foreign cultural influences, we may in fact blunt its power, making of it a purely mechanical act that contradicts basic principles of Orthodoxy.”

Understanding and correct application of the Traditions and Canons of Iconography can only come through time and experience.

One final quote from Part 4:

Mourning Christ by Christine Simoneau Hales
Mourning Christ by Christine Simoneau Hales

” The iconographer preaches the Gospel in colors and chants hymns of praise, trembling as he says, in the words of the Nativity sticheron, “How hard it is to compose hymns of love, framed in harmony.” With his art he paints the Word, plastically manifesting, indeed enfleshing the Logos. This is truly an “artistic license” of kerygmatic expression in free will. For as Christ Himself has ordained: “Go into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature.”[xxii]”

I look forward to seeing you all in Icon classes, or now on the Facebook Page you are welcome to post your work or any important links about Icons that you think will benefit the Community of Iconographers.

May God bless you and the work of your hands,

Christine Simoneau Hales

Shepherd icon
The Lord is My Shepherd Icon by Christine Simoneau Hales

Christine’s Icon website

 

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Rainy Spring!

Alan Crite Icon by Christine Hales
Allan Crite Icon by Christine Hales

Greetings Fellow Iconographers!

This spring has been rainy and cold here in upstate New York.  Normal for Spring, but what seems to be in short supply are warm sunny days in-between!  Good weather to begin some new Icons, that’s what I say!

Four Anglo/Catholic Saints
Four Anglo/Catholic Saints written by Christine Hales

My newest Icons were all shipped off to their new homes: Two to Seattle, The one with the Four Anglo/Catholic Saints, Father James Otis Sargent Huntington, OHC founder of the Order of the Holy Cross, Fr. Richard Meux Benson, SSJE, Mother Harriet Monsell, CSJB, and Priscilla Lydia Sellon.  Also to Seattle went the Icon of Allan Rohan Crite, known as the Dean of Liturgical painting in Boston.  Each of these people were inspiring in the way God moved through them in the worlds they lived in, to affect and change the status quo around them.  Showing them to my five year old granddaughter prompted her to ask “Can I be a Saint?”.  What a good question! So sweet!

The other new one is my recent St. Michael  Fighting the Dragon which is now in Miami.

St. Michael in Battle Icon
St. Michael in Battle by Christine Hales

I particularly like the way the Scripture quotation in this one calls us to remember who won/wins the heavenly battle!

The Canons in Creating Icons

One of the things I deal with often with students and clients is the question “what is it that makes an Icon a good contemporary  Icon?”  While it’s impossible to come up with a concise definition, there are some guidelines that apply. In this month’s blog, I want to speak a little about the Canons of Iconography.

Icons are sacred, or holy pictures in that they represent either a Gospel story or a Saint and are intended to draw us into the world of heaven as we look at them. They are created by an Iconographer who lives a prayerful, fasting lifestyle and who prays while they paint the Icon. It therefore is the bearer of prayers and beauty to the viewer.

On Canonicity in Icons, the following is an excerpt from  a “Road to Emmaus” interview with well-known French Iconographer, Emilie Van Taack. She was a faithful student of Leonid Ouspensky

…There is only one rule, Rule 82, decreed by the Council in Trulo, part of the Sixth Ecumenical Council. This is the iconographic canon, in which it is stated that icon painter must follow older painter, that they must be in this stream of tradition, but exactly how they are to do this is not described. What is stated is that an icon must show both the humility of the Man Jesus and His glory as God; that is, it must manifest the Incarnation. In an icon of the Lord, you must be able to see that this man who is preseneted is not only man, but also God. You must see the Person of Christ. The Council made this rule because at this period there were still some symbolic representations, like in the early Church, representing Christ by a fish, or as a sheperd, or as a lamb – not the hypostatic representation of the Person of Jesus Christ. The Council said that all of these symbolic representations are like the shadows of the Old Testament. Since we have been illumined by the truth of the New Testament, we no longer use these old and outdated symbols, but we must present Christ Himself. Who incarnated into a human body and can be represented in the body. This is the only canon, the only rule of the Church. 

In defining what is “canonical” in icon painting, we have, of course, many beautiful old canonical icons to refer to. But canonicity is difficult to define. I cannot tell you what is canonical, because icons themselves define the canons. It is a circle, and we must accept it like this. By looking at these beautiful icons, studying them, copying them, little by little they help you to see yourself this image of Christ, and then you will be able to paint it without looking to the old, because you will have it in your own heart. This is a saving situation, because in this way we cannot possess the canon: it is a free gift that God gives or takes back as He wills.”

The above is an excerpt from Anna Dumoulin’s Iconography website.  (Daughter of  Father Andrew Tregubov)

Here are some Icon writing Resources I’ve come across this past month that you might enjoy:

A short video by Iconographer Gilles Wessman that shows stages of writing an Icon of Anne&Joachim.

Water gilding sort video by Ian Knowles – gives a quick overview of the process,

Article about supports for Icon writing– egg tempera painting and new absorbent ground.

 An article about Fr. Gregory Kroug.

Christ Icon by Gregory Krug

Also, please note that there is now on this site an Icon Resources page .  Please email me with suggestions about links to add there in the future.

I’d like to close here with a quote from Father Andrew Tregubov taken from the book, published by St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press,  “Light of Christ”  Father Tregubov compiled on the works of contemporary Iconographer Gregory Kroug:

“One of the wonders of our Creator is that everything in His creation is unique.  The ” Great Artificer” touches the tiniest creature with a very special personal touch, expressing His love for it.  He never comes to us in an impersonal way, but instead reveals Himself in the context of a real personal relationship . The Icons , in the same way, are never made for the Church in general but for individual persons who pray before them and venerate them.  God, in His boundless love, already knows all people, even those in the future; and He inspires the Iconographer in such a way that the Icon will truly be His personal revelation for those who will see it.”

May your Icon writing be blessed,

Christine Hales

Icon Website                Icon Writing Classes Website             Fine Art Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stories of Saints and Icons

Dear Fellow Iconographers

Crucifixion Icon
Crucifixion Icon by Christine Hales

Have you ever wondered about the stories associated with Saints and Icons- how they have been carried down through the ages?  Joseph Campbell spoke in “The Power of the Myth” about how human beings have a thirst and hunger for stories that can help them understand and give significance and meaning to their experiences in present time.

The stories of St. Nicholas helping the poor, or St. Francis preaching to the birds, or the modern day story of the marine being saved by Saint Michael in the trenches in Korea in 1950, and so many more, are thoughts that keep us going when things are difficult.

Stories about Mary, her graceful obedience to God’s plan for her life and the many blessings that followed, and  Kateri Tekakwitha’s life of prayer and faith inspire us to stand  for God’s plans for our lives.  In Icon class we read recently about “obedience” and how that played out in the lives of some of the prophets.

These Icons, saints and stories add richness to the fabric of our lives. They lend strength and hope to our everyday lives.  If you know of any good books or reading materials that focus on  miracles and stories of saints, please share those in the comments section of this blog.  Winter is coming and a good reading list will be a help to us all!

Here is a link to the “Icons and Their Interpretation” blog that tells the lovely story of Saint Irene and Her apples.  I think you’ll enjoy it!

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St. Irene

Another interesting link I’d like to share is about a contemporary Byzantine graffiti artist Fikos in Athens, from an interview in “The Orthodox Arts Journal.

Fikos
Greek Graffitti Iconographer Fikos
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Hippocrates by Fikos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a link to a description of a new Icon class I will be teaching in Philmont, NY this fall on Thursday evenings beginning Sept 15, 6-9PM

Upcoming Classes and RETREATS:

Holy Cross Monastery, West Park, NY:

June 16-18, 2017 Introduction to Icon Writing Class

March 21 – Friday, March 24 Advanced Master Class in Icon Writing

St. James Episcopal Church, Madison Ave. NYC

June 9-11, 2017  Introduction to Icon Writing

ADVANCED ICON WRITING CLASS IN ALBANY  Westminster Presbyterian Church

Monday evenings 6-9PM  New students beginning Sept. 19.

Be blessed, my friends, and keep us in your prayers, as you are in ours.

Christine Hales                      Icon Website             Contemporary Paintings Website

Fikos
I Was Born to Love Not Hate by Fikos

 

Heat Wave and Icons!

Hello Fellow Iconographers and Greetings:

Christine at the High Line Garden in NYC
Christine at the High Line Garden in NYC

Polar Bear Zinnia in Christine's garden in Hudson Valley
Polar Bear Zinnia in Christine’s garden in Hudson Valley

The month of July has been consistently hot and so beautiful here in the Hudson Valley. Although temperatures usually reach 90 degrees+ each day, Icons are still being created and the Monday night class keeps working right on throughout all!  Here’s a photo of Carol MacNaughtons’ Saint Michael in the process of being olifa-ed.

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Also, now some works in progress photos for the Saint Kateri and Saint Isaac Jogues I am working on for the RCDA new Mausoleum.  I love working large!

The Monday Night Advanced Icon writing class will be accepting new students after Labor Day: September 12.  Please email if you would like to begin at that time. christine@newchristianicons.com

Also, Starting a 10 week Icon Writing Class in the Hudson, NY area, Thursday evenings, 6-9PM, September 15- December 1.  email if you’re interested in attending: christine@newchristianicons.com

THE VALUE OF ICONS IN THE POST MODERN WORLD

Icons are conveyors of holiness, sacredness, beauty and God’s love for mankind. Because Icons are vessels containing these attributes, they are essential in the continuing formation of our society and culture.  In a world seemingly gone mad, they are light filled and providers of God’s peace and love.

Icons that are created in an atmosphere of prayer to God, and with training in art principles and spiritual discipline cannot help but provide a spiritual compass to those viewing them.  This kind Icon becomes a visible testimony of God’s grace as it blesses the creator and the viewer.

” There is a deeper realization of God’s Presence available to us.  Through the coming of Christ and the Holy Spirit, God wishes to dwell within us in a new way: not in a mode of which we are largely unconscious, or as a kind spiritual atmosphere in which we simply live and move and have our being (Acts 17:28), but as a lover and a friend. (Song of Solomon 5:10). God wants His Presence to be consciously experienced by us.”

Above quote from the The Glenstal Book of Icons, Praying with the Glenstal Icons, Gregory Collins OSB.

To be consciously experienced, it is helpful to have holy images that serve as reminders and point the Way, even when our minds are engaged in worldly activities. It only takes a few seconds to shift our perspective to God’s perspective – truly the secret to a joy filled life!

Face of Christ Icon written by C.Hales
Face of Christ Icon written by C.Hales

One last thing worth mentioning:  I attended the Kremer Pigments workshop on “Grounds” a through workshop on materials, conditions, and possible variations, and I would recommend it highly the next time they teach it. Kremer Pigments regularly gives classes and workshops on making paints and provides a wonderful resource of technical, hands-on information.

That’s all for this month.  Enjoy the beautiful summer and please keep me in your prayers, as you are in mine.

Blessings,

Christine

www.newchristianicons.com        www.christinehales.com     www.kingdomartsministry.com

www.halesart.com

Formation and Training of Future Iconographers

altaarwestminsterwebDear Fellow Iconographers:

Following up on the blog from last month where I included the links to Iconographer Aidan Hart’s articles about Icon writing: “Introduction to Principles of Icon Training, and Principles of Icon Training Part 2 , another link has been recently published on a Russian website called mmekourdukova, which I also include here: “The Icon: Truth and Fables” by Irina Gorbunova.

Aidan Hart’s excellent articles attempt to define important principles in the training of future Iconographers, and I suggest reading each of these in order to form your own opinions, and discuss in class the important aspects of each article to your own Icon writing.  I think it’s important to keep an open mind and respect the calling of each person who has interest in Icons or creating Icons.  In the Russian( or Ukranian) article there is an element of mocking and sarcasm that I find detrimental to the humble and prayerful attitude necessary for Icon writing.  But please read, and add your own thoughts and comments._MG_8520

These two recent articles are only relevant because there are more people today interested and wanting to write Icons than in the previous century.  There can be many causes for that, but I like to think that as we explore our spirituality and gain a closer relationship to God, we need and want visual images that bring us fresh revelation of His love for mankind, his promises, His wisdom and faithfulness.  As we regularly bring these qualities of holiness to mind in our daily lives, we can then integrate them and share them with others around us.

It is often said that Icons are “windows” into the heavenly world.  When we look through those “windows” we see heaven, and are more able, as St. Paul advised ” to focus on whatever is good”.  Truly a challenge in todays world.

_MG_8554The other attractive aspect of Icon writing to me is that of “passing on” to the next generation all that I can offer in terms of living the Gospel message through Icon writing. Investing in the younger generation is a goal worthy of Icon writing in my opinion.  But how? How and what kind of  an Icon be created that will draw them in?  Good questions to ponder as we work on our Icons.

The recent Icon exhibition and pipe organ concert that I organized for the Albany, New York area at Westminster Presbyterian Church, was an experiment to see if contemporary New Yorkers would respond to Icons as art and vessels of God’s presence within the Byzantine context of worship with the five senses.  A lot of this was new information to some of the people, but familiar to others.  People came who simply wanted to see the Icons, and people came to hear composer and organist Al Fedak offer a phenomenal program of music played with a world class pipe organ.crucifixionwestminsterweb

I gave the introductory talk, introducing the concept of Byzantine worship, and Al Fedak explained the contemplative and meditative nature of the pieces he chose, and he also invited people to walk around, view and interact with the Icons.  My students and I who created the Icons were available during intermission and at the reception following to answer questions and help people understand more about what they were viewing.

It was truly  a memorable evening as we were lifted up and carried individually and collectively in worship on a Friday night in Albany amongst the community of saints! Icons on a mission!

Hope you all enjoy this beautiful summer, Happy Fourth of July!!

No Monday night Icon class on July 4!!

Please visit my website for information on upcoming Icon classes and retreats.

Have a blessed month,   _MG_8524

Christine Hales

Here’s a link to my Art/Icon Facebook page

and websites:  www.newchristianicons.com          www.christinehales.com     www.halesart.com

www.kingdomartsministry.com